Advertising: The Real Westfield Wow Factor

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With Christmas bearing down on me like a drunken uncle (and with my gift buying barely begun) I took myself off to Westfield’s brand-spanking-new Stratford City shopping centre this week, along with tens of thousands of other badly organised men.

Did I return successful, arms laden with gifts and gadgets for my friends and family? No. But I did come back with some good pictures of how brands are using Westfield – and the latest out of home technology – to execute some eye-catching and immersive advertising.

My first observation is just how drab the centre would be without the universe of ads which it hosts. In a space this size, the ads help break up the monopoly that steel and polished stone (nice as they are) can hold in places like this. Plus, I never want to look at an unadorned lift door again:

The nature of Westfield’s layout (and the distribution of its electronic screens) means that each floor can carry a series of different campaigns simultaneously. As I negotiated the shops on the ground floor it was ads for Orange and Christmas must-have-game Drake’s Deception:

Not my cup of tea (though no doubt very popular with tens of thousands of young shoppers who were, to use the old journalistic cliche, “thronging” the centre). Up on the first floor, however, was an ad that had my (dusty) wallet itching:

Wookies aside, the real Westfield Ad Wow Factor was in its larger screens.  This one dominates one of the main shopping concourses and was running a nicely produced Adidas ad when I walked past:

Impressive stuff – but perhaps the most striking was the screen above one of the outside courtyards. On sunnier days the space underneath this screen would be packed with shoppers taking a breather:

It wasn’t quite enough to push me in the direction of Westfield’s third floor cinema (to be fair, I’m not the target market for Alvin and the Chipmunks) but in a space packed with kids and families (and one which also contains a cinema) it struck me as a smart piece of planning.

With Christmas footfall at Westfield potentially in the hundreds of thousands – (made up partly of desperate men like me, clambering at the last minute to part with their cash) the centre really is a clean, modern and well-designed advertising site…with a few shops thrown in for good measure.

See you soon,

PB

PS Got something interesting to share from the world of outdoor? Get in touch with me directly on iamposterboy27@gmail.com

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Buzz In A Box

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Creating a buzz about anything in East London is difficult.

Its notoriously fashion-concious residents might look about 23, but boy have they seen it all before – so I was interested that the people the new Boxpark pop-up mall in Shoreditch used carefully targeted outdoor ads to build a bit of excitement among the trendy young things of E1 before opening its doors on 3rd December.

I snapped this ad in Hoxton a few weeks ago. I didn’t know what Boxpark was then, but I liked the look of the poster (and everyone needs a hobby).

A few weeks later I saw similar ads on some of the buses trundling both ways along Bethnal Green Road, and driving right past the site where the mall was due to ‘pop up’. More smart use of outdoor to target a fairly tightly located audience.

Just a stone’s throw away from the site itself appeared another eye-catching billboard, also carrying the Boxpark logo:

And finally, the site itself – sporting a logo which was alien in mid October, but embedded in East London – and in my mind – before the mall had even opened. And all thanks to the canny use of outdoor advertising…

Poster Boy

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Now That’s What I Call Elderly

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Now 80?! How did that happen?

I am obviously getting really old – back in 1998 when I last listened to a Now cassette (remember cassettes?)  there was no ‘blipping‘* of adverts. Hell, we didn’t even have Facebook, and the thought of sticking QR codes on posters was the stuff of science fiction..

Despite all that this ad outside a London supermarket caught my eye. I’ll be back to ‘blip’ some outdoor ads soon – and I’ll let you know how I get on.

Poster Boy

http://www.outdoormediacentre.co.uk/

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All I Want For Christmas…

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…is a shiny new 4×4. Why? Well, last week Euston was transformed into London’s busiest car showroom as Land Rover became the first motor company to throw the whole weight of the station’s ad space (via JCDecaux) behind their new Evoque. And it looked good.

Concourse e-screens became speedometers and digital six sheets became moving tyres, grabbing the attention of Euston’s 190,000 daily commuters wherever they were in the station.

Pretty cool.

We know Outdoor works brilliantly for automotive companies; the Outdoor audience buys more and more expensive cars – and, uniquely, it gives motor manufacturers the chance to put super-scaled versions of their vehicles in front of consumers – something that’s nigh-on impossible in any other media.

As Laura Schwab, Marketing Director of Land Rover explained:

“In the same way that Euston Station is a London landmark, so too is our latest product, the Range Rover Evoque – we wanted to make a bold visual impact at the largest mainline commuter station in London.”

It certainly does that. And, just a stone’s throw from my East London hideaway (it’s like the Batcave, but in Bethnal Green) I snapped another giant Evoque ad – making a big visual impact on the thousands of drivers negotiating the A11 in and out of the city…even those of us who, sadly, still commute on two wheels and not four.

Poster Boy

http://www.outdoormediacentre.co.uk/

Follow OMC on twitter @OutdoorMC

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